COVID-19 Response Grants

COVID-19 Response Grants

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Advocacy Grants

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Rule of Law and COVID-19

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

Georgian Bar Association

Georgian Bar Association

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

WISG Achieves the First Legal Recognition of a Trans Person in Georgia

02 April 2021 WISG Achieves the First Legal Recognition of a Trans Person in Georgia

On March 25, the Public Service Development Agency of the Ministry of Justice of Georgia satisfied the request of a trans woman and her gender marker was changed from male to female in her birth certificate. This is the first legal recognition a trans persons’s gender identity in Georgia. The applicant was represented by WISG through the USAID/PROLoG funded project Support Access to Legal Aid for LGBTQI Persons.

The applicant applied to the Public Service Development Agency on December 25, 2020 and submitted a certificate from a medical institution confirming that she had undergone sex reassignment surgery. The applicant’s birth certificate with corrected data has already been issued.  

There is no legislative or administrative mechanism for legal gender recognition in Georgia. In practice, without any legal basis, the state required proof of extremely invasive and expansive sex reassignment surgery, which contradicts the standards established by the International and European Courts of Human Rights, and restricts the right to legal recognition of trans persons who do not want to undergo trans-specific medical procedures and any kind of invasive intervention. WISG has been working for several years to change the existing practices and for adequate legal grounds for the state to make such decisions. WISG believes that irregularities in the gender recognition process increase the risks of unemployment and poverty for trans persons, marginalize community members, and make them even more vulnerable to hate crimes and discrimination. WISG is continuing its strategic litigation at ECtHR and domestic advocacy to ensure that LGBTQI persons are treated equitably and fairly by the state.

USAID
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