Rapid Response Grants

Rapid Response Grants

Rule of Law and COVID-19

Rule of Law and COVID-19

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

Georgian Bar Association

Georgian Bar Association

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

TDI Presents “Restitution Policy of Religious Property in Georgia”

31 July 2020 Online Presentation of Restitution Policy Document

On July 30, with the support of USAID/PROLoG, Tolerance and Diversity Institute (TDI) organized an online presentation of the policy document “Restitution Policy of Religious Property in Georgia.”  Mariam Gavtadze, TDI’s Strategic Litigation Program Director, and Giorgi Chkheidze, USAID/PROLoG Chief of Party, made opening remarks. Giorgi Noniashvili, TDI, presented the main findings of the document. Beka Mindiashvili, Head of the Tolerance Centre under the Auspices of the PDO, spoke about the challenges regarding the restitution of religious property. Representatives of various religious organizations also took part in the presentation:

  • Bishop Giuseppe Pasotto, Apostolic Administration of the Latin Catholic of Caucasus;
  • Bishop Markus Schoch, Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Georgia;
  • Merab Chanchalashvili, Chair of Jewish Union of Georgia;
  • Mikheil Avakiani, the Diocese of the Armenian Apostolic Orthodox Holy Church in Georgia and
  • Jambul Abuladze, Chairperson of Georgian Muslims’ Union.

The document covers the challenges related to property retrieval by religious communities, as well as the policy and practice of European countries. In the 20th century, the Soviet government deprived religious groups in Georgia of both religious and non-religious property (religious buildings, cemeteries, schools, lands). After independence, the state returned the property to the Georgian Orthodox Church, but the Armenian Apostolic, Roman-Catholic and Lutheran Churches, Muslim and Jewish communities did not get back the biggest part of their property. It is noteworthy that many of these religious buildings are cultural heritage sites, however, as far as the property is not returned to the historical and confessional owners, it faces destruction. The document also outlines how restitution policy in Georgia might be managed and offers specific recommendations to state institutions.  

 

USAID
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