TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Georgian Bar Association

Georgian Bar Association

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

GYLA Issues a Comprehensive Analysis of Domestic Violence and Violence against Women Legislation and Practice

16 April 2019 Merab Kartvelishvili (GYLA), Mariam Gabedava (EWMI-PROLoG), Sulkhan Saladze (GYLA),  Maka Peradze (MIA), and Gvantsa Sakanelashvili (GYLA)

On March 28, the Georgian Young Lawyers Association (GYLA) presented its analysis of significant issues of domestic violence and violence against women in the previous two years. This focus assessed progress since the creation of the human rights department with Ministry of Internal Affairs (MIA), and helped identify areas for further improvement. GYLA implements this project with USAID/PROLoG support.

Significantly, the analysis relied on information gathered through multiple sources, including GYLA’s long-standing criminal trial monitoring program; some of GYLA’s own litigated cases; decisions requested from multiple courts; statistics and other information from courts; MIA; Prosecution, as well as interviews with victims, their lawyers, police and prosecution officials and judges.  This allowed GYLA to present a comprehensive picture of domestic violence and violence against women in Georgia.

The panel discussion of the findings was enhanced by the participation of state counterparts from the judiciary, MIA, Prosecutor’s Office, and the Ombudsman’s Office.  Such open and frank discussion of both progress and shortcomings will undoubtedly further the shared objective of improved protection of human rights and women’s rights in particular.

USAID
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