TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Georgian Bar Association

Georgian Bar Association

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

Judges from Poti and Kutaisi Share Knowledge Gained in the U.S. During Judicial Exchange

31 May 2018 Judges from Poti and Kutaisi Share Knowledge Gained in the U.S. During Judicial Exchange

On May 30, two knowledge sharing sessions were held so that Georgian judges who traveled to the U.S. under USAID/PROLoG’s expanded judicial exchange activities could share the key lessons learned with their fellow judges and others. One knowledge sharing session was in Poti, Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti. It was hosted by Court Chair Teimuraz Sikharulidze, who traveled to the U.S. as a member of the April judicial exchange. The second knowledge sharing session was held in Kutaisi, Imereti. It was hosted by the Court Chair Leri Tedoradze, and the discussion was led by Judge Gocha Didava, another participant in the April exchange.

Although Poti has only two judges, twenty-two individuals participated in the session; they included judicial assistants and court staff, as well as representatives from the mayor’s office, the state-funded Legal Aid Service, and private attorneys. Judge Sikharulidze began by explaining that the caseload in Poti has increased dramatically in recent years – from 464 cases in the first quarter of 2013, to 757 cases in the first quarter of 2018. To deal with this increase and future increases in caseload, he said it is important for Georgia’s courts to adopt methods used in U.S. courts to maximize the efficiency of case management and court hearings, including improved technology and the increased use of settlement and negotiation. He also said that Georgia should adopt the U.S. practice of having lawyers and judges work together to resolve the challenges confronting the judiciary. PROLoG Deputy Chief of Party Neil Weinstein then shared with the participants the wide-ranging support that USAID/PROLoG provides to the Georgian judiciary. He also answered a series of questions from the participants regarding U.S. practices related to case management, court practices, and alternative dispute resolution.

The Kutaisi presentation was attended by nine of Kutaisi’s eleven judges. Judge Didava spoke about the way that case management is handled in both U.S. state and federal courts, the importance of electronic case management, the need for Georgia to consider the mandatory mediation of cases prior to trial, and the importance of improved relationships between judges and lawyers. Mr. Weinstein again provided an overview of the varied support that USAID/PROLoG provides to the judiciary, including how USAID/PROLoG is already working with judiciary to address many of the suggestions raised by Judge Didava.

USAID
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