COVID-19 Response Grants

COVID-19 Response Grants

Rule of Law and COVID-19

Rule of Law and COVID-19

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High Council of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

High School of Justice of Georgia

Georgian Bar Association

Georgian Bar Association

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Disciplinary Committee of Judges of Common Courts of Georgia

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

Coalition for an Independent and Transparent Judiciary

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Commercial Law

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

National Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

Arbitration Initiative Georgia

Request for Proposals (RFP) Human Rights Chair

Introduction

The East-West Management Institute (EWMI), with funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), is implementing the Promoting Rule of Law in Georgia (PROLoG) activity, the overall goal of which is to strengthen Georgia’s justice system to ensure due process, judicial independence, and the protection of human rights. A key focus of EWMI-PROLoG is to promote human rights teaching and research at the university level. In order to ensure that human rights research and teaching is improved, EWMI-PROLoG seeks to establish a Human Rights Chair at one of the Georgian universities by providing a teaching and research grant award. Human Rights Chair must be a joint project between a regional university and a Tbilisi-based law school and shall focus on the rights of marginalized groups (other than women).  The grant will also provide some limited funds for part-time researchers to support the Chair in his/her teaching, research, and outreach efforts.  

Background

The protection of human rights and respect for the rule of law requires a strong legal framework and highly functioning institutions that hold individuals and the government accountable for their actions. The legal framework must be structured to uphold judicial independence and provide equal treatment for all citizens. Institutions must operate in an open and accessible environment where laws and regulations are broadly publicized, widely understood, and fairly applied. Judicial and other legal authorities must be competent and independent in order to effectively protect human rights and the rule of law.

One way to help the justice system do a better job of protecting human rights is to help the country’s legal education system produce legal professionals who are more conversant with human rights law.  EWMI-PROLoG’s initial mapping of human rights law teaching at the university level has revealed that the majority of Georgia law faculties offer courses in human rights law, but the quality of the instruction and the course content leave room for improvement.  Generally speaking, courses are not taught in a truly interactive fashion and are not substantially case-based.  EWMI-PROLoG also found that there are few opportunities for students to learn human rights law in an “experiential” fashion (such as through moot court exercises and clinical work) and there is little academic research being pursued in the human rights law field. With this in mind, PROLoG has established Human Rights (HR) Chairs at two Georgian Universities and continues to support ILIA State University in this direction. ILIAUni HR Chair has developed and teaches several human rights courses for a master’s level law program, established a live-client HR Clinic, conducts ongoing awareness raising activities on HR issues and, among other activities, shares the knowledge with other Georgian law schools. Nevertheless, not enough activities have been carried out to promote and improve the quality of human rights teaching at regional universities across Georgia. Discrimination against religious, ethnic, racial minorities and women still remains the acute problem in the country and is especially frequent in regions. Access to justice for marginalized groups is more problematic in regions due to the lack of awareness, cultural restrictions, and/or limited financial resources. The mapping exercise to learn about teaching of human rights at Georgian law schools done by PROLoG revealed that antidiscrimination law, minority law courses and gender studies are not included on the curriculums of majority of Universities’ Law faculties; none of the regional law schools teach the above courses under their law programs and the quality of teaching of basic human rights courses is poor in regional universities in terms of content and methodology.

One of the essential steps to promote the prevention and condemnation of all forms of discrimination and to establish high standards of tolerance in society in regions is improved human rights teaching at regional law schools. Focusing on human rights education at the university level will better equip future graduates with capacity and range of skills necessary to fully protect human rights.

Proposed Activities: (Recipients must at minimum conduct the activities listed below but are encouraged to propose additional activities they think will support the overall goal of promoting human rights.)

  1. Develop and Teach Course on Human Rights Law – The Chair, in consultation with EWMI-PROLoG, is expected to develop and deliver a model law school course covering human rights law at a Georgian law school and should develop a set of supporting written interactive exercises and case-based learning materials. The course should be shared and taught at one or more regional law schools, so that the teaching quality of human rights is improved, and it becomes part of the law program curricula in regions.  The course should explore the ideas and concepts that inform human rights law and practice.  The course should not aim to cover the field of human rights exhaustively, but rather to concentrate on rights of marginalized groups (other than women). It should introduce students to the most important international mechanisms dealing with human rights cases, as well as describe how domestic mechanisms function in comparison. Overall the aim is to provide students with knowledge of the central aspects of human rights law and an ability to understand how the law is being or should be applied in the Georgian context. The course shall be taught at bachelor’s and/or master’s level.  The Chair will develop new written materials to help deliver the course – lesson plans, reading lists, practical exercises, etc. The course can be delivered as a pilot with the expectation that it will later become a part of law program curricula. EWMI-PROLoG will encourage and facilitate the exchange of ideas and information between the Chair and EWMI-PROLoG’s own international human rights experts.
  2. Conduct Professor Workshops on Human Rights Law – The Chair, in cooperation with EWMI-PROLoG, will deliver at least one workshop on the newly developed human rights course to interested university professors from around the country.  One goal of these workshops will be to promote the model exercises developed for the course and help other university professors introduce and deliver the same types of exercises at their universities.  Special attention should be given to regional departments and faculty.  If possible, the Chair will work with EWMI-PROLoG’s international human rights experts to deliver these workshops.
  3. Engage in Research and Writing - In consultation with EWMI-PROLoG, the Chair will engage in research and writing on human rights law issues.  This may include field or analytical research.  The Chair should publish at least one significant scholarly article on the topic per academic year but a higher level of academic output is encouraged.  The Chair will ideally promote and oversee other individuals’ research and writing efforts – both students and faculty.  If feasible, the Chair will collaborate with EWMI-PROLoG’s international resource partners in this research and writing.

Human Rights Law Chair

The Chair can be a full, associate, assistant, or adjunct professor.  The Chair may be provided the ability to hire postgraduate students and pay them on a part-time basis to provide research and logistical support for the Chair’s activities.

Eligibility

Any state or private Georgian university having a law faculty that is legally registered under Georgian law may apply. Collaboration with at least one regional law school in carrying out the above project is obligatory.

Duration of Grant

The grant will be 15 months in duration.

Grant Amount

EWMI-PROLoG will consider university grant funding requests up to $20,000 for a 15-month Chair.  In addition to the Chairperson’s honorarium, project budgets could include an item to support part-time graduate researchers, reasonable office expenses, and indirect cost for the school to support the Chair’s activities.     

Selection Process

EWMI-PROLoG will select the university that will receive the Chair based on the following criteria:

  • The background and experience possessed by the professor put forward for the Chair, taking into account the proposed Chair’s demonstrated interest in and commitment to promoting human rights. (Initially demonstrated by curriculum vitae of candidate and three references, for which names and contact information is required.)
  • The university’s commitment to promoting the understanding and application of human rights law and supporting the work of the Chair, both during the grant period and beyond.  This will be demonstrated by describing other human rights law teaching and activities that the university supports, as well as providing proposed shared costs, such as, the provision of office space and other tangible support for the holder of the Chair, and a clear plan for supporting the Chair after the end of the 18-month grant period.

The following general criteria will also be used to assess the projects:

  1. Degree of compliance with the objectives and requirements of the competition;
  2. Scope and relevance of the project’s impact;
  3. Effectiveness of project methodology;
  4. Cost-effectiveness of the project;
  5. Effectiveness of the monitoring and evaluation plan;
  6. Sustainability of the project (please note that sustainability can refer to activities, structures, knowledge, and outcomes that result from the project implementation);
  7. Capacity to implement the project as demonstrated by: (a) the relevant qualifications of involved personnel and/or experts and (b) past successful experience in the field; (c) capacity of the responsible organization to manage finances effectively.

EWMI-PROLoG reserves the right to fund any or none of the proposals submitted.

List of Required Documents

Interested universities should submit a completed USAID/PROLoG a) Grant Application Form; b) Budget, itemizing the costs to be covered by the grant and cost share provided by the university, and; c) the Budget Notes attached hereto.  All documents must be submitted in English. EWMI-PROLoG may require additional information from applicants before making an award.  

Forms

Please see all necessary forms HERE

Competition Timeline

Competition Announcement:  25 November 2019

Submission of Questions regarding the above RFP: 2 December 2019

Answers to Submitted Questions: 9 December 2019

Deadline for Submission of Applications: 17 January 2020

 

Contact Information

EWMI-PROLoG is located at 5 Marjanishvili Str. 0102 Tbilisi, Georgia, Tel/Fax (995 32) 2505404. Applications shall be submitted at info.prolog@ewmi.org.  E-mails must have “Human Rights Chair” in the subject line.  

USAID
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